The classes and services to offer (and NOT offer) when reopening your studio

With new social distancing laws, you’re not opening at full capacity… at least not right away. That means it’s more important than ever to maximize your cash flow per square footage during the time you’re open. Keep in mind, for every class you run you’ll have to pay for cleaning, utilities and teachers. Depending on how big your studio spaces are, you might not make much (or any) money.

Prioritize your classes based on “homeability”

Don’t try and recreate your old class schedule on Day 1. You don’t have the same capacity and you need to be intentional with your classes. You simply won’t be able to get as many members in your classes during the first phase of your reopening.

Try this → Prioritize the classes you haven’t been able to run at home.

Most yoga studios and fitness boutiques run a variety of class types, and some are more well-suited to a home practice. You could call it a high homeability factor. Other classes need a good sound system, high heat or specialized spaces. Decide what classes your studio is most conducive to hosting and plan around that.

It’s been months since your members had the full Bikram or Hot Flow class experience. They’re clamoring for them. They’re willing to wait a little longer for in-studio Yin classes. Try offering those once a month or every other week instead of filling the class schedule with them right out of the gate.  

Truth → Some classes are thriving in your virtual studio

You’ve probably found some classes are doing even better as virtual. Members are more likely to show up for an early morning sun salutation when it’s steps from their bed instead of across town. The same goes for nighttime Nidra classes. If it’s not broken, don’t fix it.

Consider your local community when you set your schedule

Local restrictions will impact how your community interacts with your studio. Members have lives outside of class. Whether they’re working from home or have childcare will play a big part in when they can get to the studio.

Ask yourself:

  • Are schools, childcare and summer camps closed in your local market?
  • Is there still heavy commuter traffic and rush hours?
  • Are people working from home? Will they really need shower facilities?

Off kilter times might work great for your reopening, depending on your local market. If most of the area is working from home, rush hour isn’t going to be a factor. Members working from home might have more flexible hours, so you’re not scheduling around a typical workday.

Make your studio space work for you every minute it’s open.

Private or semi-private classes are a great way to make use of the space, especially smaller rooms. You could do a recurring weekly time slot for $100. Whoever purchased it could bring up to four people. It would be booked ahead of time – guaranteed spot for them, guaranteed income for you.

The pricing is set at around the same rate as your autopay membership. That way it covers you if a member books it for a month ($400), brings three other members along and they all cancel their memberships. If they bring family members or friends, you come out ahead.  

Truth → Smaller, locked in classes feel safer for some members

On their end, it’s not any more expensive than a membership, so that’s an easy sell. For the same price, they get a locked in time slot. The member doesn’t have to try and book classes before they fill. It’s also more secure for them if they’re worried about getting sick. Some members are part of households with high risk people and they’d prefer to play it extra safe.

1:1 training is another great option. Create something results based with a clear goal. Track progress toward that goal with a clear strategy. Many people have gotten out of shape during this time and would love extra encouragement. This is an especially good option if your studio combines yoga and fitness.

Truth → It’s the perfect time to get creative with your offers

Bring back the yoga journey with a special series. You could create a prepaid series, either virtual or in-studio, that runs once or twice a week for a predetermined number of weeks. You could do out of the box offers, including things other than yoga or non-typical types of yoga.

Sell it to members as an add on (at a lower price) or to people in general if you’re running it online. When you’re doing it, make sure to record the classes. Then you have an evergreen video series for your virtual studio or to sell again later.

However you set up your in-studio classes, make sure the space is working for you EVERY MOMENT you’re open. 

For more super relevant information, join us for The How to Re-Open your Studio Strong Bootcamp Webinars, included in the Yogapreneur Collective. Get these lives webinars, plus the huge online resource library, private Facebook Group, and access to 1:1 coaching all for just $125.

➡️ To access the YC Webinars and so much more, sign up here.

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2 Comments

  1. This is super helpful Josh! I am also working through your How to Re-open Strong Bootcamp which is fantastic too.
    I am a Hot Yoga studio owner in my very first year of business so COVID was a real shock to the system as things were just starting to take off nicely for me. I want to say that if it wasn’t for the YC and all your help I would have probably given up and just shut the door for what would have been 4 months. I hope you realise how much help and hope you give us studio owners, as well as real tangible kick ass business advice. I personally am going to be forever grateful!

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