How to make your yoga studio a safe, profitable and fun environment when you reopen

A successful reopening is about more than going back to the way it was before. Now is the time to make your yoga studio better than ever! You’ve changed and grown as a business owner through these uncertain times and your back with more passion, determination and energy than ever before.

Golden rule of reopening → Know your local laws

The first step to reopening is to learn your local laws. These are going to make or break your studio when it comes to negligence and potential lawsuits. Don’t go by what the news is saying or what other studios are doing. Every area is different, and you don’t want any costly mistakes.

We’re all dealing with a brand-new situation. It’s okay to be overwhelmed. It’s okay to be confused or scared about what comes next. The key is creating a clear strategy to make your opening safe, profitable and fun for you and your members.

Here’s what you’ll be dealing with: limits on the number of people in a room, minimum distances between people, or both. Plus up-leveling your cleaning to make members feel ultra-safe. Let’s take it one step at a time.

Re-design your yoga room

Let’s start at the yoga room. You’ll need to grab a measuring tape and figure out exactly what your rooms dimensions are and how many members can fit. Plan where each mat will be and mark it with tape. The average person won’t be able to correctly space themselves without a mark. Save your members, teachers and yourself the stress and label it ahead of time.

Don’t have a distance requirement? Mark the floor anyway. Even if your city is limiting participants to say 25% capacity in the room, they still won’t want all 25% crammed in the front row. Your members not only want to be safe; they want to feel safe. Taking the time to plan your room layout goes a long way.

Think of it like choreography. How will members enter the room, how will they find their spots and exit? Consider adding taped marks outside the room so members remain spaced apart while they wait to enter. Dismiss them by row so there isn’t a big group socializing by the door.

Test it out with your staff. Don’t skip this step. It’s a great way to get your staff dialed in and identify problems before the members show up. Once you’ve ironed out the kinks record it and send it to your members.

Communication is key to a smooth opening

Make sure your members know what to expect. Send an email blast and let them know they can’t congregate in communal spaces. Give them a heads up on closed changing rooms and any other changes. Include a video on how they’re supposed to enter and exit the yoga space. Demonstrate proper mat set up and hang pictures of what that looks like.

Truth → The more prepared your members are the easier it will be.

Put yourself in the member’s shoes. What kind of questions will they ask? What will their concerns be? Answer all those questions ahead of time in an email sequence, on social media, your website or all three.

  • Will you have mats available? Are you expecting your members to bring their own mats? Will the rental process look different than normal? Will they only be available for purchase?
  • How will the mats be cleaned? Most yoga studios provide spray cleaner or wipes members grab after class. That’s not a great option now. Do you want students to clean their mats at home? Will individual cleaning supplies be offered?
  • What extra cleaning precautions are you taking? Show that your cleaning processes are more robust. Use chemical cleaning agents and make sure you’re cleaning high touch hard surfaces often. Don’t be shy about these changes. Members want to know to make them feel safe.
  • Do members have to pre-register? Classes will be smaller than before. You’ll need to have members pre-register for class and sign a new waiver. Denying drop-ins, even if you have room, will go a long way to making members feel safe in the space.
  • Can members pay in person? Encourage your members to pay online. This will streamline the class set up process and cut back on exchange of credit cards and money. You’ll limit close quarters interactions and keep everyone feeling safer.
  • Do members have to wear a mask? Your area may require all members to wear masks while they’re in the studio. If it does that’s an easy answer. If not consider having your staff wear masks to protect members in case they’re asymptomatic carriers. Either way, providing masks for free or purchase is a good call.

Remember to keep it fun

You need to follow the new rules to keep yourself, your staff and your members safe. That’s a given. But people are still coming to you for a yoga experience. Do what you can to give them the experience they expect from your studio.

You want your studio to be clean, but not so sterile and clinical people don’t enjoy being in the space. Rearrange your furniture or put up a fresh coat of paint to make the space feel new and inviting. Pleasant scents, positive music and fresh flowers brighten up any space. Welcome back signs are a MUST. Let your members know you’ve missed them and you’re excited to have them!

For more super relevant information, join us for The Re-Open Strong Challenge, For just $27.

This Challenge and so much more is included in the Yogapreneur Collective.

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